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Celebrating Genocide – Christopher Columbus’ Invasion of America

The Spanish Conquest of the Americas, preceded by its “discovery” by Christopher Columbus (or Cristóbal Colón as he was known by the Spanish Crown) resulted in mass assimilation, raping, slaughtering, enslaving, and intention to wipe out all evidence of a native population of between 50 and 100 million indigenous people from the land — the greatest genocide in recorded history. These well-documented atrocities include:

  • Forced hard labor.
  • Abducting and selling children into the sex trade as young as nine-years-old.
  • Mass raping of women and children.
  • The amputation of limbs if slaves were not producing ‘enough’.
  • Labelled as hostile savages if not in complete compliance with their oppressors. Buried alive or burnt alive if you were resistant to the conquerors demands.
  • Offering cash rewards for the scalps of men, women, and children as proof of murder.
  • Intentionally spreading smallpox disease, an early means of biological warfare.
  • Forced removal from homes and land onto small reservations with barren, unlivable conditions.
  • Death marches of more than one-thousand miles to these reservations in which, if you were unable to continue the walk, you were left for dead and unable to assist dying family members.
  • On these same reservations “reserved” for the indigenous people, once this land was deemed valuable, the reservation agreement was broken and they were forced to move once again. All 370 treaties signed between the U.S Government and Indian nations have been broken by the United States.

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  • Public execution of those who did not follow orders. Children were murdered by slamming them against stone and tree trunks, while pregnant women’s bellies were sliced open on public display, as a warning to those who did not comply.
  • These same mass murderers become labeled as heroes after sweeping through villages and slaughtering unarmed civilians.
  • Systematically kidnapping children and forcing them to a boarding school system in which they are beaten, forbidden to speak native language, brainwashed into becoming “Americanized”, and often molested.
  • Not entitled to the rights of citizenship in their own land until 1924.
  • Not included in the initial civil rights act; did not receive equal legal protections/rights until 1968.
  • Not allowed to practice their own ‘religion’/spirituality until 1978.
  • In the 1970’s the attendance at these brutal boarding schools peaked and it was not until 1975 that the United States Government emphasized reduction in boarding schools with most of them finally closing in the 1980s and 1990s. In 2007, there were still 9,500 American Indian children kept in boarding schools.
  • Traditional lifestyle mocked and ridiculed in mass media and in the classroom – socially acceptable to discriminate against.
  • Altered their history by ignoring and denying the truth for the past four centuries.

 

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